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Project details

Title: Influence of temperature and nutrient supply on the biogeochemical function and diversity of ocean microbes
Id: 2450
Investigator(s): Martina Doblin
University of Technology, Sydney [details]

Mark Brown
University of New South Wales - School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences [details]

Description: RV Investigator research voyage in2016_v04, titled “Influence of temperature and nutrient supply on the biogeochemical function and diversity of ocean microbes.” The goal is to resolve how changes in seawater temperature and nutrient concentrations, linked to shifting oceanographic circulation in eastern Australia, influences the diversity of microbial communities and the key biogeochemical transformations (C, N, P, Si, Fe and S) they mediate. The broader ecosystem implications for zooplankton, larval fish and marine megafauna will also be addressed. Findings will be used to improve current biogeochemical and ecosystem models to increase their accuracy in forecasting changes in ocean productivity and biogeochemical fluxes in eastern Australia. Scientific Objectives: 1. Characterise the diversity and function of microbial communities in the relatively warm EAC, against the relatively cool water of the Tasman Sea and adjacent shelf waters. 2. Conduct perturbation experiments to experimentally test the role of temperature and nutrients (particularly N and Fe) in microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations. 3. Assess the links between microbial biomass, size structure and carbon production with higher trophic levels zooplankton, micronekton and cetaceansseabirds) in a frontal eddy(ies) relative to adjacent shelf and EAC waters. 4. Sample sediments to examine water-sediment geochemical processes and historical record of plankton. For more details see the Voyage Plan.
Years: 2016
Hierachy: University of Technology Sydney » Sydney Institute for Marine Science

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Survey InvestigatorDescription
IN2016_V04

[details]
Martina Doblin RV Investigator research voyage in2016_v04, titled "Influence of temperature and nutrient supply on the biogeochemical function and diversity of ocean microbes." Scientific Objectives: 1. Characterise the diversity and function of microbial communities in the relatively warm EAC, against the relatively cool water of the Tasman Sea and adjacent shelf waters. 2. Conduct perturbation experiments to experimentally test the role of temperature and nutrients (particularly N and Fe) in microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations. 3. Assess the links between microbial biomass, size structure and carbon production with higher trophic levels zooplankton, micronekton and cetaceansseabirds) in a frontal eddy(ies) relative to adjacent shelf and EAC waters. 4. Sample sediments to examine water-sediment geochemical processes and historical record of plankton. Previous sampling opportunities have not allowed us to revisit water masses (Aim 1) or conduct replicate experiments in the same water mass (Aim 2). Our objectives are therefore to more comprehensively sample the distribution and diversity of microbes across multiple oceanographic features. This includes cross-shelf transects, but also includes cross-eddy transects by extending shelf transects offshore (Aim 3). To achieve Aim 3, we will require real-time satellite information to identify our target area, as well as access to the IMOS ocean colour, SST, SSH data archive while on board. We will also conduct in situ 'mapping' of the target frontal eddy area using the Triaxus towed underwater body before we determine the exact location of transects and daytime CTD stations. Aim 3 activities will also involve bioacoustic monitoring in the western Tasman Front off Port Stephens, and within and outside of a frontal eddy. This will involve recording data from the EK60 of all 5 frequencies (if possible), which need to be appropriately coordinated with both ADCP. We suggest the two instruments should be programmed to ping and listen together, and to ignore any EK60 deeper than 750 to 1,000 m (to be confirmed with MNF and CSIRO bioacoustics group). Aims 1 and 2 relate to our original application for ship time and are hence the top priority. The Aim 3 activities occur mostly at night, which can be integrated into the day-time focussed sampling of Aims 1 and 2. Our intent is therefore to address these aims in waters north of Bass Strait (depending on the oceanographic features present). Activities to address Aim 4 have the lowest priority and are left to later in the voyage, but PIs have indicated that sediment cores from Port Hacking (NSW) will have strong scientific value for examining sediment fluxes and looking at the historic presence of microbial taxa.
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