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Project details

Title: National Facility External Users: A.Waite (University of W.A.)
Id: 1714
Short Name: National Facility user: Waite, A.
Investigator(s): Anya Waite
University of Western Australia [details]

Description:
Years: 2003

Data


List of surveys that this project was on. Click on column header to sort.

Use [details] link to view survey details (map, reports, metadata etc) including links to download data.

Survey InvestigatorDescription
SS2011_V04

[details]
A.Waite (UWA) Southern Surveyor Research Voyage ss2011_v04 Biological Oceanography of Western Rock Lobster Larvae - Part 2. Scientific Objectives: Lack of knowledge of Western Australia's fisheries oceanography fundamentally limits understanding of the recruitment of Western Rock Lobster, Panulirus cygnus, in a fishery worth $200-300 million/year to Australia. The life cycle of P. cygnus includes a planktonic "phyllosoma" larval stage that is transported up to 1500 km offshore via ocean currents. Development continues for approximately 9 - 11 months at sea, before juveniles ("puerulus")return over the shelf to recruit to coastal reef areas. Critical to improving the management of this fishery, which is under intensive review, is appropriate process information about the oceanographic mechanisms driving coastal recruitment. The last three years of puerulus settlement have been low, with the latest (2008/09) settlement the lowest in 40 years of monitoring and not explained by the environmental factors previously identified as affecting settlement. The cause of the low settlement represents a key unknown for managers assessing the sustainability of WA's coastal fisheries, and is likely to be driven by variation in food availability during the open-ocean stage of the phyllosoma larvae. Our study will test the hypothesis that the ocean productivity, particularly the nitrate-driven classic food chain supporting diatoms, copepods and other zooplankton, limits phyllosoma growth rate and survival in their oceanic phase. We will execute this study at, or after the peak, of the autumn/winter plankton bloom in the Leeuwin Current, with the aim of quantifying oceanographic parameters crucial to modelling rock lobster larval dynamics.
SS2010_V05

[details]
A. Waite (UWA) Southern Surveyor Research Voyage ss2010_v05. The Biological Oceanography of Western Rock Lobster Larvae. Scientific Objectives Lack of knowledge of Western Australia's fisheries oceanography fundamentally limits understanding of the recruitment of Western Rock Lobster, Panulirus cygnus, in a fishery worth $200-300 million/year to Australia. The life cycle of P. cygnus includes a planktonic "phyllosoma" larval stage that is transported up to 1500 km offshore via ocean currents. Development continues for approximately 9 - 11 months at sea, before juveniles ("puerulus") return over the shelf to recruit to coastal reef areas. Critical to improving the management of this fishery, which is under intensive review, is appropriate process information about the oceanographic mechanisms driving coastal recruitment. The last three years of puerulus settlement have been low, with the latest (2008/09) settlement the lowest in 40 years of monitoring and not explained by the environmental factors previously identified as affecting settlement. The cause of the low settlement represents a key unknown for managers assessing the sustainability of WA's coastal fisheries, and is likely to be driven by variation in food availability during the open-ocean stage of the phyllosoma larvae. Our study will test the hypothesis that the ocean productivity, particularly the nitrate-driven classic food chain supporting diatoms, copepods and other zooplankton, limits phyllosoma growth rate and survival in their oceanic phase. We will execute this study at, or after the peak, of the autumn/winter plankton bloom in the Leeuwin Current, with the aim of quantifying oceanographic parameters crucial to modelling rock lobster larval dynamics. Taken from the ss2010_v05 Voyage Plan.
SS2010_V04

[details]
A. Waite (UWA) Southern Surveyor Research Voyage SS2010_v04. Assessing oceanographic delivery of nutrients to Ningaloo Reef Part I : Autumn Dynamics Scientific Objectives Ningaloo Reef is Australias largest fringing coral reef and the basis of a major tourist industry. Though diverse and delicate, coral reefs (and the controls of their productivity) remain poorly understood. Understanding the interaction of the reef with the surrounding ocean is essential for predicting and managing the impacts of human and climate-induced changes, and therefore for the effective conservation of reefs. This proposal is part of a new initiative aimed at providing a scientific basis for determining the oceanographic distance beyond which industrial developments will not damage a reefs ecological processes. This analysis is essential for maintaining guiding sustainable development in the region. We will determine the seasonal differences in the productivity and delivery of nutrients and particles, by the Leeuwin (LC) and Ningaloo Currents (NC) on the continental shelf off Ningaloo Reef, WA, with special emphasis on identifying coastal upwelling mechanisms driving reef production. This work is part of a 3-year funded ARC project (Waite, Roughan, Pattiaratchi, Kotta) comparing reef-based uptake of nutrients from the surrounding ocean with the shelf oceanography delivering materials to the Ningaloo reef. We have applied for a second voyage in summer 2011/12 to complete the study. Taken from the ss2010_v04 Voyage Plan.
SS 05/2006

[details]
Dr. Anya M. Waite (UWA) Southern Surveyor voyage SS200605
"Mesoscale Eddies as coastal pumps: quantifying eddy-mediated cross-shelf transport of nutrients, production and fish larvae off the WA coast."
Scientific Objectives
The oceanography off the coast of West Australia (WA) is dominated by the dynamics of the Leeuwin Current which transports surface waters poleward, suppressing upwelling which would otherwise supply surface nutrients for productivity in these regions. The WA coast is therefore very low in nutrients, or ultra-oligotrophic. In such waters, production hinges on the delivery of nutrients into surface waters via upwelling, atmospheric fixation, or the presence of meso-scale cyclonic eddies that pump nutrients into surface waters........
Overall Objective
To quantify the cross-shelf transport of nutrients, primary production and fish larvae by eddies forming off the WA coast.
(Taken from the SS200605 Voyage Plan).
SS 08/2003

[details]
Dr. Anya M. Waite (UWA) Key objectives for this voyage are to understand the impact of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies on the productivity of the eastern Indian Ocean, and to determine the links between the physical oceanography of these eddies, vertical nitrogen fluxes, productivity and larval fish survival.
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